Music

Meet the Family Members of Musical Keyboard

musical keyboard

Musical keyboards come under a well-established category of instruments. There are different types from high to low end, that looks fairly similar but actually, they are slightly different from each other. Let us discuss them in detail.

Synthesizer

The term ‘synthesize’ refers to create something new, either from scratch or by distorting existing material. They produce manmade digital sound effects that a standard keyboard cannot produce.

Piano

A piano is popularly used in classical and jazz music for solo and ensemble performances, accompaniment and for composing and rehearsal. It is one of the most popular;ar instruments and loved by many because of its versatility. It can be acoustic, digital, electric or electronic.

Organ

An organ can be played with either hands or feet. It is a relatively old musical instrument since the time of Ctesibius of Alexandria, the inventor of water organ. It was mainly played during races and games throughout the Greek and Roman world.

Arranger

An arranger has sophisticated backing features to produce the sound of a full band from a simple chord input. It is being used in every music style that one can imagine such as rock, classical, techno, reggae etc.

Harpsichord

The harpsichord was widely used in Renaissance and Baroque music. ‘Harpsichord’ designates the whole family of similar plucked keyboard instruments such as smaller virginals, and spinet. It produces sound by plucking a string when a key is pressed.

Accordion

The person who plays the accordion is called an accordionist. They belong to the family of box-shaped musical instruments of the bellows-driven free-reed aerophone type, colloquially referred to as the squeezebox. It is played by compressing or expanding the bellows while pressing buttons or keys, causing valves, called pallets, to open, which allow air to flow across strips of brass or steel, called reeds, that vibrate to produce sound inside the body.

Celesta

The celesta or Celeste is a struck idiophone operated by a keyboard. It looks similar to an upright piano or a large wooden music box. The sound of the celesta is similar to that of the glockenspiel, but with a much softer and more subtle timbre.

Dulcitone

Dulcitone was designed by Thomas Machell of Glasgow and manufactured by the firm of Thomas Machell & Sons during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The sound is produced by a range of tuning forks that vibrate when struck by felt-covered hammers activated by the keyboard.

There are more members such as harmonium, electronic keyboard, orchestra, spinet, virginals etc. Check them out with musical keyboard suppliers in the Philippines.

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One thought on “Meet the Family Members of Musical Keyboard

  1. Mohammad says:

    Very Nice post.! Thanks for sharing this amazing.

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